Ordnance Found Near Popular Beach Areas

Destin, Florida The Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office announced a planned detonation of three bombs found last month in the waters off the Florida panhandle. The discoveries include two 250-pound bombs and a 1,000-pound bomb, estimated to be approximately 80 years old, according to a news release issued by county officials.

Eglin Air Force Base reported that the bombs were found in January in Choctawhatchee Bay, which borders popular tourist destinations such as Destin and Fort Walton Beach. The ordnance was located in an area reportedly previously used as a bombing range.

Divers from a Navy EOD Mobile Unit are scheduled to detonate the three bombs. The ordnance was discovered in two separate locations. The 250-pound bombs were found near Two Georges Marina in Shalimar, Florida, and the 1,000-pound bomb was found during an Air-Force funded remedial investigation of the Bay Legacy Range.

Dog Uncovers WWII Era UXO Along Dunes

Winterton, England A man walking the beach with his 6-year-old cocker spaniel was shocked to see what his dog named Luna uncovered while walking along the sand dunes, a 2-inch mortar round. The man called the police to report the fins who responded and established an exclusion zone around the item.

EOD was called in to investigate and they determined the ordnance was indeed a WWII era mortar round. EOD safely counter-charged the hazard in an open detonation.

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Powerful Storms Deposit WWII Ordnance on California Beach

Pajaro Dunes, California A rusty bomb covered in debris washed up on a California shore just days after heavy surf pounded the coastline. The Santa Cruz County sheriff's bomb squad responded to inspect the bomb at Pajaro Dunes, located between Santa Cruz and Monterey.

According to a post on the sheriff's office social media site, an x-ray scan and visual inspection revealed that the ordnance was an inert military ordnance.

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Live UXO Discovered on Beach

Chalkwall, England Army EOD safely disposed of a live UXO discovered by a bait digger in Chalkwell. The Southend Coastguard responded to assist in the operation which lasted two days before Army experts decided to dispose of the 18-lbs munition in place.

A spokesperson for the coastguard said, "Over the two days our teams inspected the suspected ordnance and worked with our Dover Coastguard coordination center and the Army EOD.

"On Thursday our Army EOD colleagues attended who were escorted out to the site and it was quickly determined this was a 'live' 18lbs bomb with TNT explosives inside originating from the years 1897 to 1947, so it could have been from the first or second world wars. A cordon was put in place and the Army EOD team went to work to prepare to safely explode the device in situ, which all went to plan and was completely destroyed."

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Three WWII Mortar Rounds Wash Ashore on Essex Beach

Essex, England Three unexploded WWII mortar rounds have been safely disposed of after a person walking on the beach at Walton-on-the-Naze discovered them, Essex Police said.

Police and the coastguard quickly responded to establish a 100m cordon on the beach. A statement on the police department's social media page read, "They called in the experts from the Army disposal unit to safely destroy the ordnance at the scene. They said the unexploded rounds had washed up on the beach before they were seen by an 'eagle-eyed member of the public'."

Walton Coastguard Rescue team said the bomb disposal unit confirmed the ordnance was WWII-era. They also warned members of the public, "Please be mindful of what you find on the beach."

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Woman Finds WWII Ordnance While Walking on the Beach

Scolt Head Island, England Norfolk Police and Army EOD from Colchester responded to Scolt Head Island, an offshore barrier island located between Brancaster and Wells, after a UXO was discovered by a woman walking along the beach. A large cordon was established while the technicians safely executed a controlled explosion of the WWII-era artillery shell.

Piece of Previously Detonated Ordnance Wash Up on Beach

Studland, United Kingdom A bomb disposal squad was called to a Dorset beach after a piece of ordnance was discovered by a member of the public while walking at South Beach in Studland.

The person reported the find to the National Trust which responded to cordon off part of the beach and contacted emergency services.

The Swanage Coastguard team arrived to photograph and measure the item to send to the bomb disposal team for assessment. A Royal Navy bomb squad responded to confirm that the piece of ordnance no longer contained explosives and removed it from the scene.

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Camp Lejeune Range Patrol Warn Public to Stay Away from Browns Island

Camp Lejeune, North Carolina As summer approaches, base officials at Camp Lejeune are warning the public of the dangers at Browns Island. "Browns Island is a target area that Camp LeJeune Marines and other services have been shooting at or dropping bombs on since 1942," said Camp Lejeune Range Patrol Officer Nick Klaus.

"What may look like a rusty piece of metal in the sand, could actually be an explosive device," Klaus said. "Not less than a week ago, we found a 500-pound bomb that was on the shore exposed by the tide."

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British Coastguard Issues a Warning after Recovering Five Ordnance Items

Birling Gap, England The Birling Gap Coastguard team responded to reports of suspected pieces of ordnance at Birling Gap. A spokesperson for the team said, "The team located five old WWII shells early on Sunday morning, then came back in the evening on the next low tide to escort the armies bomb disposal [team] to assess and remove the items."

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Bottle Hunter Finds UXO on New Zealand Beach

Auckland, New Zealand A portion of bottom of Narrow Neck Beach on Auckland's North Shore was cordoned off after an old military ordnance was found by a beach goer. The North Shore man said he had been walking along the beach when he came across an old military shell.

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